APOSTOLIC SUCCESSION

  • CHRIST

  • APOSTLES

  • BISHOPS

  • YOU

If from one burning lamp someone lights another, then another from that one, and so on in succession, he has light continuously. In the same way, through the Apostles ordaining their successors, and these successors ordaining others, and so on, the grace of the Holy Spirit is handed down through all generations and enlightens all who obey their shepherds and teachers. – St. Gregory Palamas

Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops. This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles. According to historian Justo L. González, apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles. But, according to documentation produced by the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church, the “sees plays an important role in inserting the bishop into the heart of ecclesial apostolicity”.

Those who hold for the importance of apostolic succession via episcopal laying on of hands appeal to the New Testament, which, they say, implies a personal apostolic succession (from Paul to Timothy and Titus, for example). They appeal as well to other documents of the early Church, especially the Epistle of Clement. In this context, Clement explicitly states that the apostles appointed bishops as successors and directed that these bishops should in turn appoint their own successors; given this, such leaders of the Church were not to be removed without cause and not in this way. Further, proponents of the necessity of the personal apostolic succession of bishops within the Church point to the universal practice of the undivided early Church (up to AD 431), before being divided into the Church of the East, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Catholic Church. Christians of the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Old Catholic, Anglican, Moravian, and Scandinavian Lutheran traditions maintain that “a bishop cannot have regular or valid orders unless he has been consecrated in this apostolic succession.”Each of these groups does not necessarily consider consecration of the other groups as valid.

Alexandria
  1. Mark the Evangelist (43–68)
  2. Anianus (68–82)
  3. Avilius (83–95)
  4. Kedronus (96–106)
  5. Primus (106–118)
  6. Justus (118–129)
  7. Eumenes (131–141)
  8. Markianos (142–152)
  9. Celadion (152–166)
  10. Agrippinus (167–178)
  11. Julian (178–189)
  12. Demetrius I (189–232)
  13. Heraclas (232–248)
  14. Dionysius (248–264)
  15. Maximus (265–282)
  16. Theonas (282–300)
  17. Peter I (300–311)
  18. Achillas (312–313)
  19. Alexander I (313–326) First ecumenical Council occurred
  20. Athanasius I (328–339) Served as a Deacon for the First Council; became Pope of Alexandria
  21. Gregory of Cappadocia (339–346), Arian Patriarch; not accepted by the adherents of the Nicene creed (and thus not counted by Coptic Orthodox, Byzantine Orthodox or Catholic lineages).
  22. Athanasius I (346–373) (restored)
  23. Peter II (373–380)
  24. Lucius of Alexandria (373–377), an Arian installed by the Emperor and not recognized by the adherents of the Nicene Creed
  25. Timothy I (380–385) Second Ecumenical Council occurred
  26. Theophilus I (385–412)
  27. Cyril I (412–444) Third Ecumenical Council occurred
  28. Dioscorus I (444–451) Fourth Ecumenical Council occurred – Schism between Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy – Dioscorus was deposed by the Council of Chalcedon
  29. Proterius (451–457)
  30. Timothy II Aelurus (457–460)
  31. Timothy III Salophakiolos (460–475)
  32. Timothy II Aelurus (restored in opposition) (475–477)
  33. Timothy III Salophakiolos (477–482) (restored)
  34. Peter III Mongus (in opposition) (477)
  35. John I Talaias (482)
  36. Peter III Mongus (482–490) (restored)
  37. Athanasius II Kelitis (490–496)
  38. John II the Monk (496–505)
  39. John III of Nicea (505–516)
  40. Dioscorus II the Younger (516–517)
  41. Timothy IV (517–535)
  42. Theodosius I (535–536)
  43. Gainas (536–537)
  44. Paul (537–542)
  45. Zoilus (542–551)
  46. Apollinarius (551–569)
  47. John IV (569–579)
  48. Eulogius I (581–608)
  49. Theodore I (608–610)
  50. John V the Merciful (610–621)
  51. George I (621–630)
  52. Cyrus (631–641) Islam entered Egypt
  53. Peter IV (642–651)
  54. Theodore II
  55. Peter V
  56. Peter VI
  57. Theophylactus
  58. Onopsus
  59. Cosmas I (727–768)
  60. Politianus (768–813)
  61. Eustatius (813–817)
  62. Christopher I (817–841)
  63. Sophronius I (841–860)
  64. Michael I (860–870)
  65. Michael II (870–903)
  66. Christodoulos (907–932)
  67. Eutychius (932–940)
  68. Sophronius II (941)
  69. Isaac (941–954)
  70. Job (954–960)
  71. Elias I (963–1000)
  72. Arsenius (1000–1010)
  73. Theophilus (1010–1020)
  74. George II (1021–1051)
  75. Leontius (1052–1059)
  76. Alexander II (1059–1062)
  77. John VI Kodonatos (1062–1100)
  78. Eulogius (1100–1117) Coadjutor?
  79. Cyril II (1100– )
  80. Sabbas (1117– )
  81. Theodosius II ( –1137) Coadjutor?
  82. Sophronius III (1137–1171)
  83. Elias II (1171–1175)
  84. Eleutherius (1175–1180)
  85. Mark III (1180–1209)
  86. Nicholas I (1210–1243)
  87. Gregory I (1243–1263)
  88. Nicholas II (1263–1276)
  89. Athanasius III (1276–1316)
  90. Gregory II (1316–1354)
  91. Gregory III (1354–1366)
  92. Niphon (1366–1385)
  93. Mark IV (1385–1389)
  94. Nicholas III (1389–1398)
  95. Gregory IV (1398–1412)
  96. Nicholas IV (1412–1417)
  97. Athanasius IV (1417–1425)
  98. Mark V (1425–1435)
  99. Philotheus (1435–1459)
  100. Mark VI (1459–1484)
  101. Gregory V (1484–1486)
  102. Joachim Pany (1486–1567)
  103. Silvester (1569–1590)
  104. Meletius I (1590–1601)
  105. Cyril III Loucaris (1601–1620)
  106. Gerasimus I Spartaliotes (1620–1636)
  107. Metrophanes Kritikopoulos (1636–1639)
  108. Nicephorus (1639–1645)
  109. Joannicius (1645–1657)
  110. Paisius (1657–1678)
  111. Parthenius I (1678–1688)
  112. Gerasimus II Paladas (1688–1710)
  113. Samuel Kapasoulis (1710–1712)
  114. Cosmas II (1712–1714)
  115. Samuel (restored) (1714–1723)
  116. Cosmas II (restored) (1723–1736)
  117. Cosmas III (1737–1746)
  118. Matthew Psaltis (1746–1766)
  119. Cyprian (1766–1783)
  120. Gerasimus III Gimaris (1783–1788)
  121. Parthenius II Pankostas (1788–1805)
  122. Theophilus III Pankostas (1805–1825)
  123. Hierotheus I (1825–1845)
  124. Artemius (1845–1847)
  125. Hierotheus II (1847–1858)
  126. Callinicus (1858–1861)
  127. Jacob (1861–1865)
  128. Nicanor (1866–1869)
  129. Sophronius IV (1870–1899)
  130. Photius (1900–1925)
  131. Meletius II Metaxakis (1926–1935)
  132. Nicholas V (1936–1939)
  133. Christopher II (1939–1966)
  134. Nicholas VI (1968–1986)
  135. Parthenius III (1987–1996)
  136. Peter VII (1997–2004)
  137. Theodore II (2004–present)
Antioch
  1. Apostle Peter
  2. Evodius (ca. 53–ca. 69)
  3. Ignatius (ca. 70–ca. 107), who was martyred in the reign of Trajan. His seven epistles are unique sources for the early Church.
  4. Heron (107–127)
  5. Cornelius (127–154)
  6. Eros (154–169)
  7. Theophilus (ca. 169–ca. 182)
  8. Maximus I of Antioch (182–191)
  9. Serapion (191–211)
  10. Asclepiades the Confessor (211–220)
  11. Philetus (220–231)
  12. Zebinnus (231–237)
  13. Babylas the Martyr (237–ca. 250), who,according to Nicephorus,[2] was martyred in the reign of Decius.
  14. Fabius (253–256)
  15. Demetrius (ca. 256–uncertain), who was taken captive by the Persians under Shapur
  16. Paul of Samosata (260–268) supported by Zenobia, deposed by Emperor Aurelian; in Paul’s time Lucian of Antioch was head of the Antiochene catechetical school[3]
  17. Domnus I (268/9–273/4) supported by Emperor Aurelian
  18. Timaeus (273/4–282)
  19. Cyril I (283–303)
  20. Tyrannion (304–314)
  21. Vitalius (314–320)
  22. Philogonius (320–323)
  23. Eustathius (324–330), formerly Bishop of Beroea, a steadfast opponent of Arianism; he was disposed in 327 and banished in 329. However, the adherents of theNicene creedconsidered him the rightful bishop until his death.
  24. Paulinus (330, six months), formerly bishop of Tyre, Semi-Arian and friend of Eusebius of Caesarea
  25. Eulalius (331–332)
  26. Euphronius (332–333)
  27. Flacillus or Facellius (333–342), in whose time renovations were made to the great church of Antioch, according to Nicephorus.
  28. Stephanus I of Antioch (342–344), Arian and opponent of Athanasius of Alexandria, deposed in 344.
  29. Leontius the Eunuch (344–358), Arian
  30. Eudoxius (358–359), formerly bishop of Germanicia, later (360–370) bishop of Constantinople, Homoian
  31. Anianus (359), immediately deposed
  32. Meletius (360—361), Semi-Arian, deposed in the reign of Valens for Homoiousian leanings

This deposition resulted in the Meletian Schism, which saw several groups and several claimants to the see of Antioch:

The Homoiangroup

  • Euzoius (361–378), supported by EmperorValens
  • Dorotheus of Antioch (378–381)
The Meletian groupThe largest grouping, centred on the deposed bishop Meletius. It moved towards an acceptance of the Nicene creed and participated in the Council of Constantinople, but was not recognized by Alexandria or Rome:

  • Meletius (362–381), who attended the First Council of Constantinople.
  • Flavian I (381–404), he obtained the recognition of Alexandria and Rome in 399
  • Porphyrus (404–412)
  • Alexander (412–417), he ended the schism with the Eustathians in 415.
The Eustathian groupThe followers of Eustathius, strictly adhering to the Nicene creed, elected the following bishops, who were recognized by bishops of Alexandria and Rome:

  • Paulinus (362–388)
  • Evagrius (388–393)

After his death the Eustathians did not elect another bishop. In 399 they lost the recognition of Alexandria and Rome, but remained in schism until 415.

The Apollonaristgroup

  • Vitalis (376–?), formerly a follower of Meletius, consecrated byApollinaris of Laodicea
  1. Ignatius II (1342–1386)
  2. Mark (1308–1342)
  3. John VI (or V, or IV) (1090–1155)(*)
  4. Nicephorus (1084–1090)
  5. Theodosius II (1075–1084)
  6. Aemilian (1062–1075)
  7. John V (or IV), or most probably Dionysius (1051–1062)(*)
  8. Peter III (1028–1051)
  9. Eleutherius (1023–1028)
  10. Macarius the Virtuous (1015–1023)
  11. George Lascaris (1010–1015)
  12. Elias II (1003–1010)
  13. Nicholas III (1000–1003)
  14. John IV (or III) (995–1000)(*)
  15. Agapius (977–995)
  16. Theodorus II (966–977)
  17. Christopher (960–966)
  18. Eustratius (939–960)
  19. Job II (917–939)
  20. George III (902–917)
  21. Zacharias (890–902)
  22. Michael (879–890)
  23. Nicholas II (860–879)
  24. Theodosius I (852–860)
  25. Elias (840–852)
  26. Simeon (834–840)
  27. Nicholas (826–834)
  28. Job (810–826)
  29. John III of Antioch (797–810)
  30. Theodore (751–797)
  31. Theophylact (744–751)
  32. Stephen IV (742–744)
  33. Alexander II (695–702)
  34. George II (690–695)
  35. Sebastian (687–690)
  36. Theophanes (681–687)
  37. Macarius (656–681)
  38. Domnus II (442–449), deposed by the Second Council of Ephesus.
  39. Maximus II (449–455), appointed by Emperor Theodosius II, accepted the Council of Chalcedon, deposed under unclear circumstances.
  40. Basil of Antioch (456–458), Chalcedonian
  41. Acacius of Antioch (458–461), Chalcedonian
  42. Martyrius (461–469), Chalcedonian, deposed by general Zeno
  43. Peter the Fuller (469/470–471), Non-Chalcedonian, appointed by general Zeno, deposed by Emperor Leo I
  44. Julian (471–476), Chalcedonian, exiled by Peter the Fuller
  45. Peter the Fuller (476), Non-Chalcedonian, restored by usurper Basiliscus, exiled by Emperor Zeno
  46. John II Codonatus (476–477), Non-Chalcedonian, who held the see only three months and was exiled
  47. Stephanus II (477–479), Chalcedonian
  48. Calendion (479–485), Chalcedonian, opposed the Henoticon, exiled by Zeno, replaced by Peter the Fuller
  49. Peter the Fuller (485–488), Non-Chalcedonian, restored by Emperor Zeno and condemned the same year (485) by a synod at Rome
  50. Palladius (488–498), Chalcedonian, accepted the Henoticon,
  51. Flavian II (498–512), Chalcedonian, accepted the Henoticon, deposed by Emperor Anastasius I.
  52. Severus (512–518), Non-Chalcedonian, appointed by Emperor Anatasius I, deposed by Emperor Justin I.
  53. Paul the Jew (518–521)
  54. Euphrasius (521–526)
  55. Ephraim of Amid (526–546)
  56. Domnus III (546–561)
  57. Anastasius I of Antioch (561–571)
  58. Gregory (571–594)
  59. Anastasius I of Antioch (restored) (594–599)
  60. Anastasius II (599–610)
  61. Gregory II (610–620)
  62. Anastasius III (620–628)
  63. Macedonius (628–640)
  64. George I (640–656)
  65. John I (428–442), condemned the First Council of Ephesus in the Nestorian controversy
  66. Theodotus (417–428) (alternately 420–429)
  67. John VII (or VI, or V) (1155–1159)(*)
  68. Euthymius (1159–1164)
  69. Macarius II (1164–1166)
  70. Athanasius I (1166–1180)
  71. Theodosius III (1180–1182)
  72. Elias III (1182–1184)
  73. Christopher II (1184–1185)
  74. Theodore IV (Balsamon) (1185–1199)
  75. Joachim (1199–1219)
  76. Dorotheus (1219–1245)
  77. Simeon II (1245–1268)
  78. Euthymius (1268–1269)
  79. Theodosius IV (1269–1276)
  80. Theodosius V (1276–1285)
  81. Arsenius (1285–1293)
  82. Dionysius (1293–1308)
  83. Pachomius (1386–1393)
  84. Nilus (1393–1401)
  85. Michael III (1401–1410)
  86. Pachomius II (1410–1411)
  87. Joachim II (1411–1426)
  88. Mark III (1426–1436)
  89. Dorotheus II (1436–1454)
  90. Michael IV (1454–1476)
  91. Mark IV (1476)
  92. Joachim III (1476–1483)
  93. Gregory III (1483–1497)
  94. Dorotheus III (1497–1523)
  95. Michael V (1523–1541)
  96. Dorotheus IV (1541–1543)
  97. Joachim IV (Ibn Juma) (1543–1576)
  98. Michael VI (Sabbagh) (1577–1581)
  99. Joachim V (1553–1592)
  100. Joachim VI (1593–1604)
  101. Dorotheus IV (or V) Ibn Al-Ahmar (1604–1611)
  102. Athanasius II (or III) Dabbas (1611–1619)
  103. Ignatius III Atiyah (1619–1634)
  104. Euthymius II (or III) Karmah (1634–1635)
  105. Euthymius III (or IV) of Chios (1635–1647)
  106. Macarios III Zaim (1647–1672)
  107. Neophytos of Chios (1673–1682)
  108. Athanasius III Dabbas (first, or antipatriarchal, reign) (1685–1694)
  109. Cyril V (or III) Zaim (antipatriarchal reign 1672–1694, 1694–1720)
  110. Athanasius III Dabbas (second reign) (1720–1724)
  111. Sylvester (1724–1766)
  112. Philemon (1766–1767)
  113. Daniel (1767–1791)
  114. Anthemius (1791–1813)
  115. Seraphim (1813–1823)
  116. Methodius (1823–1850)
  117. Hierotheos (1850–1885)
  118. Gerasimos (1885–1891)
  119. Spyridon (1891–1898)
  120. Meletius II (Doumani) (1899–1906)
  121. Gregory IV (Haddad) (1906–1928)
  122. Alexander III (Tahan) (1931–1958)
  123. Theodosius VI (Abourjaily) (1958–1970)
  124. Elias IV (Muawad) (1970–1979)
  125. Ignatius IV (Hazim) (1979–2012)
  126. John X (Yazigi) (2012–)
Constantinople
BISHOPS OF BYZANTIUM (UNTIL 330)
  • 1. St. Andrew the Apostle (38) – founder
  • 2. St. Stachys the Apostle (38–54)
  • 3. St. Onesimus (54–68)
  • 4. Polycarpus I (69–89)
  • 5. Plutarch (89–105)
  • 6. Sedecion (105–114)
  • 7. Diogenes (114–129)
  • 8. Eleutherius (129–136)
  • 9. Felix (136–141)
  • 10. Polycarpus II (141–144)
  • 11. Athenodorus (144–148)
  • 12. Euzois (148–154)
  • 13. Laurence (154–166)
  • 14. Alypius (166–169)
  • 15. Pertinax (169–187)
  • 16. Olympianus (187–198)
  • 17. Mark I or Marcus I (198–211)
  • 18. Philadelphus (211–217)
  • 19. Cyriacus I (217–230)
  • 20. Castinus (230–237)
  • 21. Eugenius I (237–242)
  • 22. Titus (242–272)
  • 23. Dometius (272–284)
  • 24. Rufinus I (284–293)
  • 25. Probus (293–306)
  • 26. St. Metrophanes (306–314)
  • 27. St. Alexander (314–337)

On May 11, 330 the town of Constantinople was consecrated by the Roman emperor Constantine I on the site of an already-existing city, Byzantium, thus becoming the capital of the East Roman Empire (known also as Byzantine Empire).

ARCHBISHOPS OF CONSTANTINOPLE (330–451)
  • 28. St. Paul I (“the Confessor”) (337–339)
  • 29. Eusebius of Nicomedia (339–341)
    • Paul I (341–342), restored 1st time
  • 30. Macedonius I (342–346)
    • Paul I (346–350), restored 2nd time
    • Macedonius I (351–360), restored
  • 31. Eudoxius of Antioch (360–370)
    • Florentius (c. 363)
  • 32. Demophilus (370–380)
  • 33. Evagrius (370 or 379)
  • 34. Maximus I (380)
  • 35. St. Gregory I Nazianzus the Theologian (379–381)
  • 36. Nectarius (381–397)
  • 37. St. John Chrysostom (398–404)
  • 38. Arsacius of Tarsus (404–405)
  • 39. Atticus (406–425)
  • 40. Sisinnius I (426–427)
  • 41. Nestorius (428–431)
  • 42. Maximianus (431–434)
  • 43. St. Proclus (434–446)
  • 44. St. Flavian (446–449)
  • 45. St. Anatolius (449–458) (Patriarch from 451)
BISHOPS/PATRIARCHS OF CONSTANTINOPLE (SINCE 451)

451–998

  • 46. Gennadius I (458–471)
  • 47. Acacius (471–488)
  • 48. Fravitas (488–489)
  • 49. Euphemius (489–495)
  • 50. Macedonius II (495–511)
  • 51. Timothy I (511–518)
  • 52. John II the Cappadocian (518–520)
  • 53. Epiphanius (520–535)
  • 54. Anthimus I (535–536)
  • 55. Menas (536–552)
  • 56. Eutychius (552–565)
  • 57. John III Scholasticus (565–577)
    • Eutychios (577–582), restored
  • 58. John IV Nesteutes (582–595)
  • 59. Cyriacus (596–606)
  • 60. St. Thomas I (607–610)
  • 61. Sergius I (610–638)
  • 62. Pyrrhus I (638–641)
  • 63. Paul II (641–653)
    • Pyrrhus I (653–654), restored
  • 64. Peter (654–666)
  • 65. Thomas II (667–669)
  • 66. John V (669–675)
  • 67. Constantine I (675–677)
  • 68. Theodore I (677–679)
  • 69. George I (679–686)
  • 70. Paul III (687–693)
  • 71. Callinicus I (693–705)
  • 72. Cyrus (705–711)
  • 73. John VI (712–715)
  • 74. Germanus I (715–730)
  • 75. Anastasius (730–754)
  • 76. Constantine II (754–766)
  • 77. Nicetas I (766–780)
  • 78. Paul IV (780–784)
  • 79. Saint Tarasius (784–806)
  • 80. Nicephorus I (806–815)
  • 81. Theodotus I Kassiteras (815–821)
  • 82. Antony I (821–836)
  • 83. John VII Grammaticus (836–843)
  • 84. Methodius I (843–847)
  • 85. Ignatius I (847–858)
  • 86. Photios I the Great (858–867)
    • Ignatius I (867–877), restored
    • Photios I the Great (877–886), restored
  • 87. Stephen I (886–893)
  • 88. Antony II Kauleas (893–901)
  • 89. Nicholas I Mystikos (901–907)
  • 90. Euthymius I Synkellos (907–912)
    • Nicholas I Mystikos (912–925), restored
  • 91. Stephen II of Amasea (925–928)
  • 92. Tryphon, also Tryphonius (928–931)
  • 93. Theophylactus (933–956)
  • 94. Polyeuctus (956–970)
  • 95. Basil I Scamandrenus (970–974)
  • 96. Antony III the Studite (974–980)
  • 97. Nicholas II Chrysoberges (984–996)
  • 98. Sisinnius II (996–999)

999–1453

  • 99. Sergius II (1001–1019)
  • 100. Eustathius (1019–1025)
  • 101. Alexius I the Studite (1025–1043)
  • 102. Michael I Cerularius (1043–1058)
  • 103. Constantine III Leichoudes (1058–1063)
  • 104. John VIII Xiphilinos (1063–1075)
  • 105. Kosmas I (1075–1081)
  • 106. Eustratius Garidas (1081–1084)
  • 107. Nicholas III Grammaticus (1084–1111)
  • 108. John IX Agapetus (1111–1134)
  • 109. Leo Styppeiotes (1134–1143)
  • 110. Michael II Kourkouas (1143–1146)
  • 111. Cosmas II Atticus (1146–1147)
  • 112. Nicholas IV Muzalon (1147–1151)
  • 113. Theodotus II (1151–1153)
  • 114. Neophytos I (1153–1154)
  • 115. Constantine IV Chliarenus (1154–1156)
  • 116. Luke Chrysoberges (1156–1169)
  • 117. Michael III of Anchialus (1169–1177)
  • 118. Chariton (1177–1178)
  • 119. Theodosius I Boradiotes (1178–1183)
  • 120. Basil II Kamateros (1183–1186)
  • 121. Niketas II Mountanes (1186–1189)
  • 122. Leo Theotokites (1189–1190)
  • 123. Dositheus (1190–1191)
  • 124. George II Xiphilinos (1191–1198)
  • 125. John X Kamateros (1198–1206)
  • 126. Michael IV Autoreianos (1206–1212)
  • 127. Theodore II Eirenikos (1214–1216)
  • 128. Maximos II (1216)
  • 129. Manuel I Charitopoulos (1216–1222)
  • 130. Germanus II (1223–1240)
  • 131. Methodius II (1240)
    • vacant (1240–1244)
  • 132. Manuel II (1244–1255)
  • 133. Arsenius Autoreianus (1255–1259)
  • 134. Nicephorus II (1260–1261)
    • Arsenius Autoreianus (1261–1265), restored
  • 135. Germanus III (1266)
  • 136. Joseph I Galesiotes (1266–1275)
  • 137. John XI Bekkos (1275–1282)
    • Joseph I Galesiotes (1282–1283), restored
  • 138. Gregory II Cyprius (1283–1289)
  • 139. Athanasius I (1289–1293)
  • 140. John XII (1293–1303)
    • Athanasius I (1303–1310), restored
  • 141. Nephon I (1310–1314)
  • 142. John XIII Glykys (1314–1320)
  • 143. Gerasimos I (1320–1321)
  • 144. Isaias (1321–1334)
  • 145. John XIV Kalekas (1334–1347)
  • 146. Isidore I (1347–1350)
  • 147. Callistus I (1350–1354)
  • 148. Philotheus Kokkinos (1354–1355)
    • Callistus I (1355–1363), restored
    • Philotheus Kokkinos (1363–1376), restored
  • 149. Macarius (1376–1379)
  • 150. Nilus Kerameus (1379–1388)
  • 151. Antony IV (1388–1390)
    • Macarius (1390–1391), restored
    • Antony IV (1391–1397), restored
  • 152. Callistus II Xanthopoulos (1397)
  • 153. Matthew I (1397–1410)
  • 154. Euthymius II (1410–1416)
  • 155. Joseph II (1416–1439)
  • 156. Metrophanes II (1439–1443)
  • 157. Gregory III Mammas (1443–1450)
  • 158. Athanasius II (1450–1453)

On May 29, 1453 occurred the Fall of Constantinople, thus marking the end of the Byzantine Empire. The Ecumenical Patriarchate became subject to the Ottoman Empire.

1453–1466

  • 159. Gennadius II Scholarios (1454–1456)
  • 160. Isidore II Xanthopoulos (1456–1462)

There are different suggestions by scholars for the succession of the Patriarchs from 1462 to 1466. The main positions are the following:

According to Kiminas (2009):[2]

  • 161. Joasaph I, Apr 1462 – Apr 1463
  • Gennadius II, Apr 1463 – June 1463
  • 162. Sophronius I, Jun 1463 – Aug 1464
  • Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1465
  • 163. Mark II, aut. 1465 – aut. 1466
  • 164. Symeon I, au. 1466 – end 1466
According to Laurent (1968):[3]

  • Joasaph I, Apr 1462 – Apr 1463
  • Gennadius II, Apr 1463 – May 1463
  • Sophronius I, May 1463 – July 1464
  • Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1465
  • Symeon I, autumn 1465
  • Mark II, beg. 1466 – aut. 1466
According to Gemanos of Sardeis (1933–38):[4]

  • Gennadius II, sum. 1462 – sum. 1463
  • Sophronius I, Aug 1463 – Aug 1464
  • Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1464
  • Joasaph I, beg. 1465 – beg. 1466
  • Mark II, beg. 1466 – mid 1466
  • Symeon I, mid 1466 – end 1466

1466–1833

  • 165. Dionysius I (end 1466–1471)
    • Symeon I of Trebizond (1471–1475), restored 1st time
  • 166. Raphael I (1475–1476)
  • 167. Maximus III (1476–1482)
    • Symeon I of Trebizond (1482–1486), restored 2nd time
  • 168. Nephon II (1486–1488)
    • Dionysius I (1488–1490), restored
  • 169. Maximus IV (1491–1497)
    • Nephon II (1497–1498), restored 1st time
  • 170. Joachim I (1498–1502)
    • Nephon II (1502), restored 2nd time
  • 171. Pachomius I (1503–1504)
    • Joachim I (1504), restored
    • Pachomius I (1504–1513), restored
  • 172. Theoleptus I (1513–1522)
  • 173. Jeremias I (1522–1524)
  • 174. Joannicius I (1524–1525)
    • Jeremias I (1525–1546), restored
  • 175. Dionysius II (1546–1556)
  • 176. Joasaph II (1556–1565)
  • 177. Metrophanes III (1565–1572)
  • 178. Jeremias II Tranos (1572–1579)
    • Metrophanes III (1579–1580), restored
    • Jeremias II Tranos (1580–1584), restored 1st time
  • 179. Pachomius II (1584–1585)
  • 180. Theoleptus II (1585–1586)
    • Jeremias II Tranos (1587–1595), restored 2nd time
  • 181. Matthew II (1596)
  • 182. Gabriel I (1596)
    • Theophanes I Karykes (locum tenens, 1596)
    • Meletius I Pegas (locum tenens, 1597)
  • 183. Theophanes I Karykes (1597)
  • 184. Meletius I Pegas (locum tenens, 1597–1598)
    • Matthew II (1598–1602), restored 1st time
  • 185. Neophytus II (1602–1603)
    • Matthew II (1603), restored 2nd time
  • 186. Raphael II (1603–1607)
    • Neophytus II (1607–1612), restored
  • 187. Cyril I Lucaris (locum tenens, 1612)
  • 188. Timothy II (1612–1620)
    • Cyril I Lucaris (1620–1623), restored 1st time
  • 189. Gregory IV (1623)
  • 190. Anthimus II (1623)
    • Cyril I Lucaris (1623–1633), restored 2nd time
  • 191. Cyril II Kontares (1633)
    • Cyril I Lucaris (1633–1634), restored 3rd time
  • 192. Athanasius III Patelaros (1634)
    • Cyril I Lucaris (1634–1635), restored 4th time
    • Cyril II Kontares (1635–1636), restored 1st time
  • 193. Neophytus III of Nicaea (1636–1637)
    • Cyril I Lucaris (1637–1638) restored 5th time
    • Cyril II Kontares (1638–1639), restored 2nd time
  • 194. Parthenius I (1639–1644)
  • 195. Parthenius II (1644–1646)
  • 196. Joannicius II (1646–1648)
    • Parthenius II (1648–1651), restored
    • Joannicius II (1651–1652), restored 1st time
  • 197. Cyril III (1652–1652)
    • Athanasius III (1652), restored
  • 198. Paisius I (1652–1653)
    • Joannicius II (1653–1654), restored 2nd time
    • Cyril III (1654), restored
    • Joannicius II (1655–1656), restored 3rd time
  • 199. Parthenius III (1656–1657)
  • 200. Gabriel II (1657)
  • 201. Parthenius IV (1657–1659)
  • 202. Theophanes II (1659)
    • vacant (1659–1662)
  • 203. Dionysius III (1662–1665)
    • Parthenius IV (1665–1667), restored 1st time
  • 204. Clement (1667)
  • 205. Methodius III (1668–1671)
    • Parthenius IV (1671), restored 2nd time
  • 206. Dionysius IV Muselimes (1671–1673)
  • 207. Gerasimus II (1673–1674)
    • Parthenius IV (1675–1676) restored 3rd time
    • Dionysius IV Muselimes (the Muslim) (1676–1679), restored 1st time
  • 208. Athanasius IV (1679)
  • 209. James (1679–1682)
    • Dionysius IV Muselimes (the Muslim) (1682–1684), restored 2nd time
    • Parthenius IV (1684–1685) restored 4th time
    • James (1685–1686), restored 1st time
    • Dionysius IV Muselimes (the Muslim) (1686–1687), restored 3rd time
    • James (1687–1688), restored 2nd time
  • 210. Callinicus II (1688)
  • 211. Neophytus IV (1688)
    • Callinicus II (1689–1693), restored 1st time
    • Dionysius IV Muselimes (the Muslim) (1693–1694), restored 4th time
    • Callinicus II (1694–1702), restored 2nd time
  • 212. Gabriel III (1702–1707)
  • 213. Neophytus V (1707)
  • 214. Cyprianus I (1707–1709)
  • 215. Athanasius V (1709–1711)
  • 216. Cyril IV (1711–1713)
    • Cyprianus I (1713–1714), restored
  • 217. Cosmas III (1714–1716)
  • 218. Jeremias III (1716–1726)
    • Callinicus III (1726)[5]
  • 219. Paisius II (1726–1732)
    • Jeremias III (1732–1733), restored
  • 220. Serapheim I (1733–1734)
  • 221. Neophytus VI (1734–1740)
    • Paisius II (1740–1743), restored 1st time
    • Neophytus VI (1743–1744), restored
    • Paisius II (1744–1748), restored 2nd time
  • 222. Cyril V (1748–1751)
    • Paisius II (1751–1752), restored 2nd time
    • Cyril V (1752–1757), restored 1st time
  • 223. Callinicus IV (1757)
  • 224. Serapheim II (1757–1761)
  • 225. Joannicius III (1761–1763)
  • 226. Samuel I Chatzeres (1763–1768)
  • 227. Meletius II (1769–1769)
  • 228. Theodosius II (1769–1773)
    • Samuel I Chatzeres (1773–1774), restored
  • 229. Sophronius II (1774–1780)
  • 230. Gabriel IV (1780–1785)
  • 231. Procopius I (1785–1789)
  • 232. Neophytus VII (1789–1794)
  • 233. Gerasimus III (1794–1797)
  • 234. Gregory V (1797–1798)
    • Neophytus VII (1798–1801), restored
  • 235. Callinicus V (1801–1806)
    • Gregory V (1806–1808), restored 1st time
    • Callinicus V (1808–1809), restored
  • 236. Jeremias IV (1809–1813)
  • 237. Cyril VI (1813–1818)
    • Gregory V (1818–1821), restored 2nd time
  • 238. Eugenius II (1821–1822)
  • 239. Anthimus III (1822–1824)
  • 240. Chrysanthus I (1824–1826)
  • 241. Agathangelus I (1826–1830)
  • 242. Constantius I (1830–1834)

On July 23, 1833 the Church of Greece declared itself autocephalous. It was followed by the Romanian Orthodox Church in 1864, the Bulgarian Exarchate in 1872, and the Serbian Orthodox Church in 1879, thus reducing the extension of the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

1834–1923

  • 243. Constantius II (1834–1835)
  • 244. Gregory VI (1835–1840)
  • 245. Anthimus IV (1840–1841)
  • 246. Anthimus V (1841–1842)
  • 247. Germanus IV (1842–1845)
  • 248. Meletius III (1845)
  • 249. Anthimus VI (1845–1848)
    • Anthimus IV (1848–1852), restored
    • Germanus IV (1852–1853), restored
    • Anthimus VI (1853–1855), restored 1st time
  • 250. Cyril VII (1855–1860)
  • 251. Joachim II (1860–1863)
  • 252. Sophronius III (1863–1866)
    • Gregory VI (1867–1871), restored
    • Anthimus VI (1871–1873), restored 2nd time
    • Joachim II (1873–1878), restored
  • 253. Joachim III (1878–1884)
  • 254. Joachim IV (1884–1887)
  • 255. Dionysius V (1887–1891)
  • 256. Neophytus VIII (1891–1894)
  • 257. Anthimus VII (1895–1896)
  • 258. Constantine V (1897–1901)
    • Joachim III (1901–1912), restored
  • 259. Germanus V (1913–1918)
    • vacant (1918–1921)
  • 260. Meletius IV (1921–1923)

On July 24, 1923 the Ottoman Empire dissolved, replaced by the Republic of Turkey.

1923–PRESENT
  • 261. Gregory VII (1923–1924)
  • 262. Constantine VI (1924–1925)
  • 263. Basil III (1925–1929)
  • 264. Photios II (1929–1935)
  • 265. Benjamin I (1936–1946)
  • 266. Maximus V (1946–1948)
  • 267. Athenagoras I (1948–1972)
  • 268. Demetrios I (1972–1991)
  • 269. Bartholomew I (1991–present)
Jerusalem
  1. James the Just (to 62)
  2. Simeon I (62-107)
  3. Justus I (107-112)
  4. Zacchaeus (112-116)
  5. Tobias (?)
  6. Benjamin I (?-117)
  7. John I (117-119)
  8. Matthew I (119-120)
  9. Philip (?-124)
  10. Senecas (?)
  11. Justus II (?)
  12. Levi (?)
  13. Ephraim I (?)
  14. Joseph I (?)
  15. Judas (?-134)
  16. Mark (134-156)
  17. Cassianos (?)
  18. Pouplios (?)
  19. Maximos I (?)
  20. Julian I (?)
  21. Gaius I (?)
  22. Gaius II (?)
  23. Symmachos (?)
  24. Julian II or Valens (?)
  25. Capion (?)
  26. Maximos II (?)
  27. Antonios (?)
  28. Valens (?)
  29. Dolichianos (?–185)
  30. Narcissus (185-212)
  31. Dios (?)
  32. Germanion (?)
  33. Gordios (?)
  34. Alexander (213-251)
  35. Mozabanus (251-266)
  36. Hymeneus (266-298)
  37. Zambdas (298-300)
  38. Hermon (300-314)
  39. Macarius I (314-334)
  40. Maximus III (334-348)
  41. Cyril I (350-386)
  42. John II (386-417)
  43. Praylius (417-422)
  44. Juvenal (422-458)
  45. Anastasius I (458-478)
  46. Martyrius (478-486)
  47. Sallust (486-493)
  48. Elias I (494-516)
  49. John III (516-524)
  50. Peter (524-544)
  51. Macarius II (544-552)
  52. Eustochius (552-564)
    Macarius II (564-575) second time
  53. John IV (575-594)
  54. Amos (594-601)
  55. Isaac (601-609)
  56. Zacharias (609-632)
  57. Modestus (632-634)
  58. Sophronius I (634-638)
    See vacant (638-?)
  59. Anastasius II (?-706)
  60. John V (706-735)
  61. John VI (735-760)
  62. Theodore (760-782)
  63. Elias II (782-797)
  64. George (797-807)
  65. Thomas I (807-821)
  66. Basil (821-842)
  67. Sergius I (842-844)
    See vacant (844-855)
  68. Solomon (855-860)
    See vacant (860-862)
  69. Theodosius (864-879)
  70. Elias III (879-907)
  71. Sergios II (908-911)
  72. Leontius I (911-929)
  73. Athanasios I (929-937)
  74. Nicholas (937)
  75. Christodoulus I (937-950)
  76. Agathon (950-964)
  77. John VII (964-966)
  78. Christodulus II (966-969)
  79. Thomas II (969-978)
    See vacant (978-981)
  80. Joseph II (981-985)
  81. Orestes (986-1006)
    See vacant (1006-1012)
  82. Theophilus I (1012-1020)
  83. Nicephorus I (1020-1048)
  84. Ioannikios (1048-?)
  85. Sophronios II (?-1059)
  86. Efthimios I (?-1084)
  87. Simeon II (1084-1106)
  88. Savvas (1106-?)
  89. John VIII (1106-1156)
  90. Nicholas (?-1156)
  91. John IX (1156-1166)
  92. Nikiphoros II (1166-1170)
  93. Leontius II (1170-1190)
  94. Dositheos I (1191)
  95. Mark II (1191-?)
    See vacant (?-1223)
  96. Euthemios II (1223)
  97. Athanasios II (1224-1236)
  98. Sophronios III (1236-?)
  99. Gregory I (?-1298)
  100. Thaddeus (1298)
    See vacant (1298-1313)
  101. Athanasius III (1313-1334)
  102. Gregory II (1332)
  103. Lazarus (1334-1368)
  104. Arsenios (1344)
    See vacant (1368-1376)
  105. Dorotheos I (1376-1417)
  106. Theophilos II (1417-1424)
  107. Theophanes I (1424-1431)
  108. Joachim (1431-1450)
  109. Theophanes II (1450-1452)
  110. Athanasios IV (1452-1460)
  111. Jacob II (1460)
    See vacant (1460-1468)
  112. Abraham I (1468)
  113. Gregory III (1468-1493)
    See vacant (1493-1503)
  114. Mark III (1503)
    See vacant (1503-1505)
  115. Dorotheus II (1506-1537)
  116. Germanus (1537-1579)
  117. Sophronius IV (1579-1608)
  118. Theophanes III (1608-1644)
  119. Paisios (1645-1660)
  120. Nectarius (1660-1669)
  121. Dositheus II Notarius (1669-1707
  122. Chrysanthus (1707-1731)
  123. Meletius (1731-1737)
  124. Parthenius (1737-1766)
  125. Ephraim II (1766-1771)
  126. Sophronios V (1771-1775)
  127. Abraham II (1775-1787)
  128. Procopius I (1787-1788)
  129. Anthimus (1788-1808)
  130. Polycarp I(1808-1827)
  131. Athanasius V (1827-1845)
  132. Cyril II (1845-1872)
  133. Procopius II (1872-1875)
  134. Hierotheus (1875-1882)
  135. Nicodemus (1882-1890)
  136. Gerasimus (1891-1897)
  137. Damianus (1897-1931)
  138. Timotheos (1935-1955)
    vacant (1955-1957)
  139. Benedict (1957-1980)
  140. Diodoros (1981-2000)
  141. Irenaios (2001-2005)
  142. Theofilos III (2005-present)
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